Government Technology

“We want ProudCity to be able to serve every single city in America, and make it quick and affordable for them to do that,” said Luke Fretwell, chief executive officer of the company. “And if that means the smaller cities are paying little to nothing because they just can’t afford it, then it’s our job to do that.”

Government Technology

ProudCity was named to the Government Technology and e.Republic Labs 2017 GovTech100 list of the “leading 100 companies focused on government as a customer, having developed an innovative or disruptive offering to improve or transform government, or having created new models for delivering services.”

StateScoop

ProudCity’s new Service Center meets people where they are by delivering city services through government profile pages.

Government Computer News

Now the company is making it easier for cities to port those online services to popular platforms such as Facebook and mobile devices.

Government Technology

San Rafael, Calif., now has two portals — one on its website and one on its Facebook page. The city is an early adopter of the just-launched ProudCity Service Center, a tool that can be embedded directly into Facebook, a mobile app or as a widget on any website. The center acts as something of a how-to guide, using iconography to direct citizens to the services they’re looking for and then directing them on how to get what they need.

TechCrunch

ProudCity CEO Luke Fretwell wrote a guest post for TechCrunch on the investment opportunities around government technology.

Government Technology

Cities are embracing the concept of beta testing, saying that the best thing to do before going live with a new website is to, in fact, launch a website.

ELGL

What I do know is that we’re about to embark on a journey with two forward thinking companies and we’re going to make something awesome. We found two vendors that align with our goals and it’s going to make a real difference in the lives of our staff and in the community.

Government Technology

ProudCity offers an out-of-the-box, enterprise-level website platform to small- and medium-sized cities that want the latest technology, but don’t want the price tag that comes with a large Web design firm. Founders say they were responding to cities’ frustrations over paying too much, up front, for IT products. ProudCity offers instead a “try before you buy” option intended to let governments test drive the product both internally and with external stakeholders. Cities can access cutting-edge Web design tools for free, without having to devote a big piece of the budget to something they haven’t had a chance to try.

Spark Plug Labs

Spark Plug Labs President and Founder Monica Phillips hosted NextRequest founder and CEO Tamara Manik-Perlman and ProudCity CEO Luke Fretwell on her weekly radio show Powerful Conversations.

Full story.

Route Fifty

Procurement didn’t take months, and the price was affordable for a town of Hinsdale’s size for services rivaling those of a city website serving millions.

Full story.

Opensource.com

Opensource.com re-published our thoughts on ProudCity as an open organization, based on Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst’s book “Open Organization.”

Full story.

Engaging Local Government Leaders

Have you been hearing the term “software-as-a-service” everywhere? Wondering what the “SaaS” acronym means? Fear not – ELGL member Luke Fretwell is here to explain this concept to you, and why it matters for your local government now (and into the future).

Full story.

Government Computer News

Setting up on ProudCity was easy, West Carrollton Public Relations Coordinator Erika Mattingly told GCN. The beta site was built in about one month, with only Mattingly herself and one secretary working on it. “To be honest, when we started the project, I didn’t think that would be possible,” she said.

Full story and interview.

StateScoop

“Our philosophy around building technology is to really not to lock government in,” Fretwell said. “Our platform really gives them the freedom because we feel like we can have a competitive advantage around building a great product and customer experience.”

Full story and interview.

Government Technology

“Today ProudCity advertises itself as an out-of-the-box, enterprise-level website platform to localities — primarily small to medium-sized cities — that want the latest technology, but don’t want the pricing of a large Web design firm. Considering the potential impact for cities, Government Technology selected ProudCity as part of its inaugural GovTech100, a listing of notable public-sector companies as well as one of five startups to watch in 2016.”

Full story and interview.

Government Technology

“Online service delivery is getting a lot less complex, and the remaining barriers to government innovation online are falling away. What previously required a significant volume of physical infrastructure has been replaced by virtual infrastructure. Perhaps we are seeing the next tipping point of Web innovation, because what used to require significant development time and resources can now be pushed online in a 10-step wizard.

The future is here, and it is a lot simpler.”

Full story

Government Technology

As part of a new feature — GovTech100 — Government Technology and e.Republic Labs listed “the top 100 companies focused on government customers,” and ProudCity was selected as one of “5 to Watch” in 2016, “early-stage companies … that are already writing the next chapter of public sector innovation.”

Full story

Government Computer News

Spinning up a website these days it trivially easy. It’s the work that comes after launch that’s the problem.

That’s especially true for city governments, according to longtime civic technologist Luke Fretwell. While larger cities may have in-house developers to update code and add new functionality, he told GCN, smaller municipalities often scrape together funding for a one-time development effort, then live with the finished product for years — only to repeat the process when new funding can be secured or the old site breaks down entirely.

Full story